Tag Archives: tanzania

N’Giresi Village, Tanzania

The local village of the Wa Arusha tribe are cousins of the Maasai, but unlike the Maasai, are a farming community. We offer a visit to this village as a pre-tour for our Tanzania Adventures.  This time, I went with Kristie and we had a great experience.  This is not a show, this is real village life.

We walked several miles through the village through banana and coffee plantations. These ladies walked uphill about 3 miles from the market with heavy loads on their heads.  And we were tired from carrying our camera bags?
© Diane Kelsay

© Diane Kelsay

We visited a traditional healer and she showed us her collection of medicinal plants. It was very dark, only an open door. I asked her to hold up the pretty plant into the light and caught some light on her face too.

© Diane Kelsay

The healer’s house with a pile of cornhusks.
© Diane Kelsay

 

Drying the corn.
© Diane Kelsay

 

© Diane Kelsay

© Diane Kelsay

© Diane Kelsay

Lunchtime for the goats.
© Diane Kelsay

We asked for a demonstration of how to process the coffee beans (the coffee they served us was amazing)

Shelling coffee beans.
© Diane Kelsay

Tossing the beans into the air for the shells to fly off. The shells are light skins and she assists by blowing them as she tosses.
© Diane Kelsay

Then they are dropped into the roaster. She stirred them over the fire until roasted just perfectly. We could see why this coffee was so great. Everything is done on the farm.
© Diane Kelsay

Many people like to search for the chameleon while walking down this road. 
© Diane Kelsay

It was Saturday but some of the village children were in school.  Others were not. I’m not sure how the system works.  When we approached the doorway, the noisy kids milling about all went to their seats and looked like model students.

Listening intently to the teacher. Then they sang us a song.
© Diane Kelsay

Kristie really loved the children. See her quote below.
© Diane Kelsay

“These kiddos stole my heart from the very first.  How I wish I could be in Tanzania today.  Something in my soul is telling me to get back there as quickly as I can. I miss the people, the animals, the landscapes and the rhythm of life”. She posted this on facebook and I asked permission to copy it here.  Kristie is right on with everything she said.  We have many friends in Tanzania and look forward to every visit. When I go back to this village, I will bring a print for the healer.  She was amazed to see her photo on the back of the camera.  I’ve emailed the guide so he can show her but they love getting prints. Everyone appreciates our visits and the few dollars we bring to the community.

Consider joining us on a Tanzania adventure in the future and we will introduce you to the people, the animals, the landscape.

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Elephants!

Mt. Kilimanjaro emerges from the clouds,  just as this mom and baby step into the scene.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

It’s always nice when such a majestic animal arrives in great light to complete your landscape composition. OK, I had the driver/guide move forward, then back, then a little forward… Depth of field and lining things up “just so” was important.

Amboseli National Park, Kenya
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

It’s fun to catch elephants at the waterhole. Fast shutter speeds captured the drops and splashes of water.

Baby elephant
©Bob Harvey

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

And they do love water.  They also like to add dust and/or mud after cleaning up in the water. That helps control the insects.

© Diane Kelsay

© Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Rubbing up against a muddy wall – a mud massage.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

How great they look after their mud bath.  And not so much appeal to insects.
© 2018 Diane Kelsay

It’s nice to combine all sizes, showing various stages of maturity. A panorama crop omits the boring parts of the scene and brings to attention the parade of different sizes.

Elephants crossing the dry lakebed, Amboseli National Park, Kenya. The water behind them is a mirage.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

But what can be cuter than a tiny baby dwarfed by the size of adults next to the baby.  This strategy of enclosing the baby is done to protect them, but it gives a chance to create unusual and artistic photos. You don’t have to always show the whole animal, try some tight crops.  In these photos, the tight crops emphasize the size of the adult legs and the smallness of the babies while making creative compositions.

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© Bob Harvey

Elephants along the banks of the Chobe River.
© 2018 Bob Harvey

An early morning stroll. They look very content.

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Taking the time to learn about the animals, as well as watching their behavior, will help capture interesting images.  Join us on one of our Africa trips and we will spend time helping you choose the right settings and suggest compositions.

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World Rhino Day

Last week we visited Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.  It was great to see and photograph so many rhinos roaming about in a natural habitat protected from poachers. They are doing a fabulous job with rhino conservation and we are happy to support that.  Join our Kenya Adventure and you will be supporting this too.  More on Kenya later as well as a lot from the Mara Crossing Adventure from Tanzania. We were a month out in the field, but we will catch up on this adventure with many stories and photos.

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Continuous Shooting

As I, Diane, explained in the previous post, I like to watch animal behavior and pick the moment.  That said, there are times when continuous is the best option.  Like the antics of a zebra taking a dust bath.  Sometimes events happen so quickly (like seeing a cloud of dust that might have action) it’s hard to follow with your eye, let alone pick the moment. And there were many to choose from, a real bonus.

Zebra taking a dust bath.
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Bob writing, now… I was crouching on the edge of a cliff where puffins are flying in from the sea with little fish to feed their young in burrows very close to where I am standing, but also spread out along at least a kilometer of cliff edge.  Birds were coming in from the sea in a steady stream.  They knew where their burrow was, but I didn’t.  As they approached the cliff edge, they would suddenly pivot and fly parallel to the cliff, looking for an opportunity to land at their burrows.  They fly like little bullets.  From the time they make that turn to the time when all you can see is the backside is a matter of 5 to 10 seconds.  One has to “lock on” to focus as they approach, follow the turn, and then make a batch of continuous releases.  Assuming your follow focus holds (and it does more often than not with current technology) you’ll get to pick from several images.  If you get really lucky, like I did in this image, the puffin will make one more turn toward you to land at a nearby burrow.  Then instead of a sideways image, you get more of a head-on shot!

© 2018 Bob Harvey

 

It’s important to build your skills at recognizing and capturing unique moments. There are times when your eye can’t follow the speed of the action and continuous exposure is a great too.

Botswana, Fish Eagle coming in for the catch.
© 2018 Diane Kelsay

The next frame on continuous!
© 2018 Diane Kelsay

Alaska Bears – who gets the next salmon?
© 2018 Bob Harvey

Zebra wars
© Bob Harvey

Understand that there are times when you are in a quiet place and rapid fire could disturb the wildlife and/or your fellow travelers, causing you all to miss the shot.

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Exploring Tanzania February/March 2017

Post 4 – Weather has such and impact on landscapes.  There is just no such thing as “bad weather”.  It’s nice to have a variety, and we did.

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Bob Harvey

Baobab trees in sunlight shows off the golden trunk.
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Giant Baobab trees in a storm look small against a threatening sky.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Acacia trees
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

 

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

We explored Arusha National Park for the first time in search of Colobus and Blue Monkeys.

Blue monkey
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Blue monkey
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Blue monkey
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Colobus monkey
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Colobus monkeys
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

This is our last post on this trip. We hope you will join us on one of our future trips to Tanzania.  And if you are just starting the blog, please scroll down through posts 1-3.  The first photo in post 1 I have in my head all the time. It’s my “go to” space when I need a boost.  Following are some miscellaneous animal photos, some of them quite entertaining.

The elephant spa, babies in there too!
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

The mud treatment does wonders.
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

And the results – just gorgeous, look at the red!
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Take. Me. Seriously.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

On the hunt, creeping along.
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Precious
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Dung beetle – yes, it is rolling dung into a giant ball.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Crowned cranes
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

OK, I’ve had days like this.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Cape buffalo looking so innocent. They are very dangerous!
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Tawny eagle looking for prey.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

European roller waiting to catch a bug flying by.
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Bob Harvey

The two giants
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

The King
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Don’t forget to look at our Tanzania Photography Safari web page!

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Exploring Tanzania February/March 2017

Post 3 – Having a leisurely time to photograph animals was a real treat.  Sometimes you can see potential and you just have to wait – like a bird capturing a bug in its beak or a lion sitting on a limb in partial sunlight while you wait for that glow to come around to the eyes.  And sometimes you have to be ready and respond fast – like a flamingo taking off, a hippo opening its mouth, or a zebra taking a dust bath (which only lasts seconds).  Sometimes it’s fun to study and capture expressions and behavior.

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Bob Harvey

Lovebird
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Lovebirds
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Lovebirds
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Ostrich
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Yellow billed storks
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Yellow billed stork
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Hornbill
© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Bob Harvey

Bat eared fox
© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Vervet monkey
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Warthog
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Adorable cat.  Couldn’t end with a warthog face!
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

 

 

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Exploring Tanzania February/March 2017

Post 2 – The Great Migration was in full swing.  From our lodge at Lake Masek to the Central Serengeti, great numbers of wildebeest and their newborn babies paraded in lines and sometimes just covered the landscape.

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Bob Harvey

Lion, perched up high watching the parade of food.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Cheetahs waiting for an opportunity.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Leopards haul their kill into trees.  As we watched the mom and baby high up in the tree, the catch fell to the ground sending them down to collect it and haul it up again.

The little one follows the mom down the tree to rescue the food.
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Bob Harvey

This time, the mom wedges the kill into the crotch of the tree – more secure.  The little one goes right to it.

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

 

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Bob Harvey

 

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Exploring Tanzania February/March 2017

Post 1 – In February and March of this year, we visited some new places, checked out some new lodges and had some incredible moments.  We spent some time at our usual spots too and came back with some great experiences.  Every visit to Tanzania presents different opportunities.  This year was the most amazing migration ever, as you will see in future posts.  And the elephants just posed perfectly under the baobab trees.  We had our best ever cat moments – lions, cheetahs and leopards.  This post is about the new baby lions and a really good mother (and she had her paws full).  We watched in awe.

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

The mom had her cubs inside a hollow in some brush but they were determined to come out and play. © 2017 Bob Harvey

The mom had her cubs inside a hollow in some brush but they were determined to come out and play.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Bob Harvey

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Her eyes are on the one that always wanders. © 2017 Diane Kelsay

Her eyes are on the one that always wanders.
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

Gotcha - although he did escape again (it must have been a boy). © 2017 Diane Kelsay

Gotcha – although he did escape again (it must have been a boy).
© 2017 Diane Kelsay

This game went on and on © 2017 Bob Harvey

This game went on and on – he’s getting “the look”
© 2017 Bob Harvey

All gathered, time to head back into the bushes for the night. © 2017 Bob Harvey

All gathered, time to head back into the bushes for the night.
© 2017 Bob Harvey

Keep checking back.  Next you will see how sibling cheetahs fight over who gets to carry the kill and a leopard mom also with her paws full.

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Tanzania Photography Safari

Post 2 –

Mom and baby hippos © 2015 Bob Harvey

Mom and baby hippos
© 2015 Bob Harvey

It’s so much fun to watch the interaction between moms and babies.  Sometimes we like to capture the relationship and sometimes it’s fun to just compose artistically.

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Gazelles © 2015 Bob Harvey

Gazelles
© 2015 Bob Harvey

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

The adult female lion left this bundle of cubs to endure a downpour.  They changed positions and took turns getting pelted by the rain.  They looked so miserable, no cover for miles.

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Bob Harvey

© 2015 Bob Harvey

Poor lion in back is getting doused again as the other lion shakes off the water. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Poor lion in back is getting drenched again as the other lion shakes off the water.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Rain stops, sun comes out, all is better. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Rain stops, sun comes out, all is better.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Bob Harvey

© 2015 Bob Harvey

© 2015 Bob Harvey

© 2015 Bob Harvey

Rhinos © 2015 Bob Harvey

Rhinos
© 2015 Bob Harvey

Storm is brewing. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Storm is brewing.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Downpour at sunset © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Downpour at sunset
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Continue below to Post 1

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Tanzania Photography Safari

Post 1 – Tanzania is a land of much excitement.  Animals move about in search of food and water – some for a few miles, while others are on the great migration.  Sometimes we waited for light, sometimes we waited for action.  Many times we witnessed how the animals behaved in a variety of situations, which gave us opportunities for some special photography.

Leopard © 2015 Bob Harvey

Leopard
© 2015 Bob Harvey

Leopards and rhinos, very difficult to find and this year we were lucky to get both at reasonable distances.  It did take some patience, waiting for this leopard to get up and walk out of the shade, and only for a few seconds.

Black rhinos © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Black rhinos
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

 

Cheetah brothers stalk a lost Wildebeest baby, and then together jump into a charge. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Cheetah brothers stalk a lost wildebeest baby, and then together jump into a charge.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Only one of the cheetahs will make the kill.  The other will return to eat. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Only one of the cheetahs will make the kill. The other will return to eat.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Cheetah smothers to finish the kill. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Cheetah smothers to finish the kill.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Cheetah © 2015 Bob Harvey

Cheetah
© 2015 Bob Harvey

A lilac breasted roller is quick to snap up this insect. © 2015 Bob Harvey © 2015 Bob Harvey

A lilac breasted roller is quick to snap up this insect.
© 2015 Bob Harvey

Cape buffalo and friend. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Cape buffalo and friend.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Baby elephant © 2015 Bob Harvey

Baby elephant at the water hole.
© 2015 Bob Harvey

Zebras at the water hole. © 2015 Bob Harvey

Zebra at the water hole.
© 2015 Bob Harvey

Panning a zebra at 1/30 second. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Panning a zebra at 1/30 second.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Wildebeest running hard, panning at 1/30 second. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Wildebeest running hard, panning at 1/30 second.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Our group had a lot of fun learning this technique. It does take some practice. You must pan with the animal as you shoot at a slow shutter speed.

Lions resting, or as much as they can with flies bothering them. © 2015 Diane Kelsay

Lions resting, or as much as they can with flies bothering them.
© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

© 2015 Diane Kelsay

Join us in February 2017 for our next safari to Tanzania!

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