Tag Archives: bird photography

The Pantanal – Jabiru Storks

First light on the Jabiru Stork nest.  Three young ones watching the adult fly about.

First Light on the Jabiru nest
© 2019 Bob Harvey

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

 

This young one thinks flying looks like fun, getting restless.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

WooHoo, flying!
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Coming in for a landing.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

The adult takes off again to find some goodies to bring back.

Adult heading to the marshy area.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Returning with goodies from the marsh.
© 2019 Bob Harvey

Our guide tells us they bring back wet vegetation, adding it to the nest to cool it down.  It also has some good stuff to eat like fish and snails.

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Enjoying a fish for breakfast.
© 2019 Bob Harvey

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

The Jabiru is the tallest flying bird in South and Central America. Come join us in 2021 to photograph this nest and other Jabiru sightings in the Pantanal of Brazil.

Link to our Pantanal Wild Photography Adventure

 

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Birds!

Colors! Textures! Shapes!  Serious birders, don’t leave.  There is more to photographing birds than grabbing a shot and checking a list.

Feathers of a Shining Sunbeam. You only get a glimpse most of the time. It takes patience to see all the colors.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

It’s been a month since my last post – I have been in Ecuador’s Chocó Cloud Forest and then on to the Pantanal in Brazil.  I’m sharing some of my thoughts and photos from Ecuador in this post.

Racket-tailed Puffleg
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

This was my 4th time in the last 16 months in this region and I was determined to improve my skills for hummingbird photography.  It’s a challenge! They move fast. For the above image, I concentrated on the background I chose and with the depth of field I wanted.  I had my exposure right where I wanted it and then just waited for a bird to fly into my “zone” for focus (that would be the place it would hover and wait for its turn at the feeder).  I was lucky enough to capture several birds.  (I also got a few out of focus or parts of birds – ok, more than a few).

Andean Emerald
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

With this cutie, I captured it with a dark background (forest in shadows) and used the bounce-light from a wall behind the feeder to add the necessary fill light for an otherwise backlit bird (sun was to the right).

Violet-tailed Sylph
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Violet-tailed Sylph
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Using multiple flash certainly brings out the colors.  This is my favorite hummingbird.

Crimson-rumped Toucanet
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Crimson-rumped Toucanet
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

While the bird is clearly named for its backside, which is quite beautiful, I just love the way the turquoise feathers play over the lime green in a graceful curl.

Toucan Barbet
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

This Barbet was dancing all over the place trying to get attention. It was a workout to get a position to show all the colors.  Gorgeous bird.

Blue-winged Mountain Tanager
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Flame-faced Tanagers
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Black-capped Tanager © 2019 Diane Kelsay

Masked Flowerpiercer
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

My favorite time was sitting at the reflection pool, watching birds come and go.  Every so often one lined up “just so”.  And oh yeah, I broke that famous rule about horizon lines going through the middle.  When I did, it was the most exciting composition for that scene.  And yes, I managed to ID the birds in this blog (newbie birder), but I’m still a “break the rules” artist first.  You can join us in Ecuador to improve your bird photography skills and bring home lots of exciting images (you might even learn a few names).  Our groups are small and our Ecuador guide is an expert birder.

Link to our Ecuador Birds Photography Adventure

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Ecuador Bird Photography

Some birds seem to play with their food.

Pale mandibled Aracari – playing with food? This catch was tossed about for a few minutes.
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Some birds eat early – meaning we have to eat breakfast VERY early to get out and catch this one.

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

And some will enjoy their favorite treats anytime – and need to, so they can keep that energy up.

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Join us in Ecuador for exciting bird photography.

See details here

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Ecuador Bird Photography

Gorgeous morning, just ate a delicious moth, what better time to take a bath!

Masked Flowerpiercer
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Masked Flowerpiercer
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Masked Flowerpiercer
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Masked Flowerpiercer
© 2019 Diane Kelsay

Keep watching for more bird photo posts.

Also, consider joining our next group for fun bird photography.

See the details here  

 

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Cloudforest Birds of Ecuador

Ecuador 2018 – After much encouragement from our trusty mainland guide in Quito, we explored the cloud forests seeking new wildlife and scenery photo options. His relative, the most noted birding guide in Ecuador, was our guide.  We were amazed at the wealth of experiences we had and filled cards like crazy with colorful birds and cloud forest scenes and critters.

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Bob Harvey

From the cloud forest, we explored the Paramo for mountain vistas and the world’s largest hummingbird.

© 2018 Diane Kelsay

© 2018 Bob Harvey

© 2018 Bob Harvey

Link to our Ecuador Birds web page.  2019 is full, but we still have space in 2020!

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Northern Costa Rica, December 2016

Post 2 – We continue our journey through Costa Rica’s wetlands.  (see the previous post)

Jabiru Stork and Wood Storks
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Egret is offering help to the stork? That fish is big enough for 2!
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Wood Stork
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Nice catch!
© 2016 Bob Harvey

Tiger Heron
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

And then we make our way up to the mountains, Mondeverde Cloud Forest.

© 2016 Diane Kelsay

View from the canopy trail.
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

© 2016 Diane Kelsay

© 2016 Bob Harvey

Hummingbird
© 2016 Bob Harvey

© 2016 Bob Harvey

© 2016 Diane Kelsay

© 2016 Bob Harvey

We finish our journey on the flanks of Tenorio volcano and at Cano Negro, close to the border of Nicaragua.  More birds, frogs, lots of macros and the best place for the sloth.

© 2016 Bob Harvey

Wood-Rail
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Keel-billed Toucan
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Another nice catch!
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Anhinga
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Cormorant
© 2016 Bob Harvey

Red-eye Tree Frog
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Blue Jeans Frog
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Caiman – What did he think of our group?
“Next time take your group swimming”
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

What our groups think of our Northern Costa Rica trip.
© 2016 Diane Kelsay

Join us for our next adventure in Northern Costa Rica

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Happy New Year

We hope your holiday season was filled with great moments and experiences. Now it is time to think forward to 2014 and we wish you a wonderful year filled with new memories.

© 2013 Bob Harvey

© 2013 Bob Harvey

We encourage you to think creatively and pursue your interests.  And as always, we encourage you to appreciate the wonders of nature and to use your photographs to encourage others to do the same.

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

Our holiday season…  We heard that in Trinidad, the Scarlet Ibis fly into the mangroves at dusk and decorate the mangroves – like Christmas trees.  So, for Thanksgiving, we went to see the Christmas trees decorated by nature.  What an experience to see thousands of ibis fill the air from every direction to land in their mangroves.

Ibis flying to the mangroves © 2013 Diane Kelsay

Ibis flying to the mangroves
© 2013 Diane Kelsay

Scarlet Ibis in mangroves, Trinidad © 2013 Diane Kelsay

Scarlet Ibis in mangroves, Trinidad
© 2013 Diane Kelsay

We left behind the snow…

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

There was plenty of nightlife…

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

We spent our Thanksgiving reflecting on how special nature is and how important it is to appreciate and give thanks for all we have.  And of course, being thankful for the enjoyment of sharing time out there with all of you.

© 2013 Bob Harvey

© 2013 Bob Harvey

© 2013 Bob Harvey

© 2013 Bob Harvey

© 2013 Bob Harvey

© 2013 Bob Harvey

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

© 2013 Diane Kelsay

Let’s all have a wonderful 2014!

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